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Quick temporary fix for a missing or broken car windows

Posted by powerwindowrepairservices@gmail.com on November 3, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Note: For obvious safety reasons, this method is only recommended for side windows, not windshields or rear windows.


DO NOT USE DUCT TAPE ON PAINTED SURFACES OR ON GLASS. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO CLEAN THE RESIDUAL ADHESIVE WHEN IT IS REMOVED.  If you do use duct tape, you may need to try more than one method such as rubbing alcohol, WD40, or Goo Gone.  However, in order to achieve full success... Perseverance and patience are key factors in getting this mess off your car.

 


Materials


A roll of clear (no string running through it) packing tape. A towel or something with which to wipe dust off the door. Masking tape to protect the paint. Paper or similar material may be used for some parts, but masking tape will be needed to seal the bottom of your "window." An assistant. I've done this alone, but a second person helping with the placement of the tape makes things go much more quickly and smoothly.


Preparing to quick-fix a broken car window.


Open the door and wipe as much dust as possible from the part of the door's edge that is not visible when it is closed, as well as from the painted area around the window frame. If weather permits, you can use water to speed this up, but make certain the surface is dry before proceeding to the next step. Run a length of masking tape two finger-widths wide along the bottom of the window frame and stretching the entire width of the door. Cover all painted portions of the door above the length of masking tape with masking tape. Paper or other non-adhesive material can be used by placing it against the door as the packing tape is applied in later steps.


Applying the tape inside the car.


Take a strip of packing tape that is approximately a hand's width longer than the door is wide and run it along the length of the two finger-widths masking tape you placed at the bottom of the window frame, covering most or all of it. Keep the tape as taught as possible as you apply it. If there is a side-view mirror, run the tape around it, avoiding gaps as much as possible. Secure the strip at both ends by pressing the ends firmly into the part of the edge of the door that cannot be seen when it is closed. Taking another strip of similar length, go up slightly higher than the last strip, and place it so that the bottom edge of the second strip overlaps the top of the first strip by approximately one finger-width. Repeat the last step all the way up the door, remembering to make the pieces as taught as possible, as the less give there is to the tape, the less noisy and more durable it will be. At the top of the door, run a final piece of tape across the top edge that makes contact both with the last strip you placed and the top edge that cannot be seen when the door is closed. This will help to seal against leakage. If there was a mirror you had to work around, take pieces of tape 3-4 inches long and cover any hole between the mirror and the tape "window." Too much slack in the window will create excess noise while driving, and going around a mirror will create slack. Find any points where there is too much slack in the window and pinch them to tighten-up the surface.


Fixing a broken window: inside the car.


This can be accomplished with the door open or closed, but open will give you more room to work with. The goal is to create a complimentary layer on the inside of the tape window that runs from the top to the bottom (as opposed to the left-to-right method for the outside layer). Move carefully and slowly for this portion. You are sticking adhesive to adhesive, so if you get it wrong, it can be difficult to pull the tape off and restart. The tape can make contact with the interior surface of the car door if you wish, but that is not needed. The point is to cover the interior of the window so that dust. dirt and passengers do not become stuck to it, so overlapping is only need to the extent it prevents gaps between pieces of tape. This will make the window stronger as well. Extra attention should be given to sealing the area around any side-view mirror.


If portions of the window glass remain, instead of doing the inside layer as described above, you can simply do it in the same manner as the outside layer, thereby leaving a gap between the two layers and effectively sealing-in any loose or broken glass.


If your car is the type that you are more likely to replace it than the window because a new window would cost more than the value of the car, save yourself some hassle and skip the masking tape.:)


Orlando Power Window Repair

 

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